Tag Archives: William Faulkner

Transatlantic Writers: Between the Wars

The early Twentieth Century was a critical time for American literature. America was producing its own share of writers inspired by the Modernist experiment across the Atlantic, and those experiments in turn shaped American literature in perpetuity. In this period, many Americans went across the sea to Europe – most famously with the so-called ‘Lost […]

William Faulkner taking a break

Losing Battles

In the short history of the United States, there’s arguably no conflict that has impacted the county’s culture, image, and politics more than the Civil War that ended in 1865. Unsurprisingly, the conflict has  been portrayed many times in books, film, and television in a variety of ways. No single work or author seems to […]

Creepy Crawly Short Reads for Halloween

  This Halloween, are you ready for some dark-side literature to complement the spirit of the season, but aren’t in the mood to commit to an entire book? Short stories can provide you with just the right number of chills to do the job. Longer dark nights, the crunch and maelstrom of dead leaves underfoot […]

Friend or Foe: Writers and their Feuds

Friction among writers has all the earmarks of a good fiction story, but make no mistake; it does exist in real life. Writers have long been associated with harboring resentment over the success of their colleagues, especially when their work has not reached the same levels of popularity. Competition does not always occur on the […]

Faulkner’s Rowan Oak

Slipping through a cold metal turnstile, I enter Rowan Oak, William Faulkner’s home in Oxford, Mississippi. The gatekeeper, an Ole Miss graduate student reading a worn-out Thomas Pynchon paperback and wearing leather sandals, accepts my $5 ticket and waves me through into the house. Rowan Oak, a primitive Greek revival house set on four acres […]

Minimalism vs. Maximalism

Since the mid 20th Century, American writing has been broadly divided into two schools, minimalism and maximalism, each exemplified by the dueling greats, Hemingway and Faulkner. Whereas Hemingway relied on sparse prose, scrubbed of metaphor and symbolism, Faulkner was the opposite: his sentences beautifully rambled across the page, and his characters and their shameful histories […]