Category Archives: Novels and Short Stories

Raymond Carver - photo by Jerry Bauer

Short Stories Remain Alive

As we’ve learned, American authors of short stories were once regarded as less prominent than novelists.  Many readers would await their favorite short story writers to break out with a novel.  And if and when that happened, critics would call them “debut authors.” Although that has changed, it still is challenging for many writers to […]

Five Under-read World War I Works

In early 1918, the first U.S. soldiers arrived in France to join the Allied forces in the Great War (as it was then known). Many future American writers would take part in the war efforts in one way or another, and some of the most famous works of American Modernism reflect those experiences and the […]

Tour group at the Featured Works tables

Edgar Allan Poe-Themed Tour!

Since October 16, we’ve been giving two Edgar Allan Poe themed tours a day at the American Writers Museum. They end today, so just in case you missed them, we thought we would share the experience with our fans nationwide! Follow along as we go on a tour of the Museum, focused on the king […]

In Their Own Words: John Scalzi

John Scalzi is an American science fiction author and former president of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America. He is best known for his Old Man’s War series, three novels of which have been nominated for the Hugo Award, and for his blog Whatever, where he has written on a number of topics since 1998. He won the Hugo Award for Best Fan […]

William Faulkner taking a break

Losing Battles

In the short history of the United States, there’s arguably no conflict that has impacted the county’s culture, image, and politics more than the Civil War that ended in 1865. Unsurprisingly, the conflict has  been portrayed many times in books, film, and television in a variety of ways. No single work or author seems to […]

Short and Sweet: The American Short Story

American writers of short stories used to be regarded as less prominent than novelists. In fact, many readers would anxiously await their favorite short-story authors to embark on a novel, as they considered their short stories something of a warm-up exercise. And when that novel was born, such writers would often be referred to by […]

John Cheever and the Loneliness of Suburbia

John Cheever, America’s foremost documentarian on the lifeless routines and endless yard maintenance of suburbia, made his permanent move out of Manhattan and into a Dutch Colonial farmhouse in Ossining in 1961. In 1964, “The Swimmer” was published in The New Yorker, a short story which follows a socially well-regarded and youthful man as he traverses […]

In Their Own Words: Ana Simo

Ana Simo is the author of a dozen plays, a short feature film, and countless articles. A New Yorker most of her life, she was born and raised in Cuba. Forced to leave the island during the political/homophobic witch-hunts of the late 1960s, she first immigrated to France, where she studied with Roland Barthes and participated […]

In Their Own Words: Kathleen Rooney

Kathleen Rooney is a founding editor of Rose Metal Press, a publisher of literary work in hybrid genres, and a founding member of Poems While You Wait, a team of poets and their typewriters who compose commissioned poetry on demand. She teaches English and Creative Writing at DePaul University and is the author of eight […]

Cover of The Radium Girls by Kate Moore

In Their Own Words: Kate Moore

Kate Moore is the author of The Radium Girls, the first-ever narrative non-fiction account of this inspirational true story. Kate was born in Northampton, England and grew up in Peterborough. She studied English Literature at the University of Warwick. A Sunday Times bestselling author, she writes across various genres, from biography and history to gift and humour, and […]